Coccidioides detect (IgA, IgG, IgM)

The first recorded case of Coccidioidomycosis occurred in 1891 in Argentina. C. immitis exists in soil and in the semi-arid regions of the western hemisphere in an area extending from California to Argentina (1). In the United States, cases have been reported in Arizona, Nevada, Utah, New Mexico, and Texas. The spectrum of disease caused by C. immitis ranges from benign infection (“San Joaquin Valley Fever”) to severe disseminated process (“coccidioidal granuloma”) (2). About 60% of primary infections by C. immitis are asymptomatic. Systemic disease occurs in about 40% of primary infections and ranges from mild respiratory infection to severe pneumonia. The clinical syndrome of some C. immitis infections, with higher incidence in females than males, is similar to delayed hypersensitivity to fungus and is considered to be an allergic phenomenon. (3).

Coccidioidin (CDN), the broth culture filtrate of mycelia of C. immitis has been the classic antigen preparation for immune response to this fungus (4). As many as 90% of persons who reside in areas epidemic for coccidioidomycosis manifest skin-test reactivity to CDN.

The majority of patients with active coccidioidal disease have elevated serum IgG (5). IgA is elevated in about 20% of patients with active disease with the higher frequency occurring in patients with pulmonary coccidioidomycosis. Generally, antibodies directed against C. immitis antigens have been detected within the IgM, IgG, IgA and IgE classes.

Studies showed sensitive serological assays such as EIA increase the sensitivity but slightly decrease the specificity (6). The Micro Detect “COCCIDIOIDES DETECT IgA” is an EIA assay which uses the cell-filtrate of C. immitis as the antigen for detecting specific serum IgA to C. immitis in human sera.

Coccidioides IgA

The first recorded case of Coccidioidomycosis occurred in 1891 in Argentina. C. immitis exists in soil and in the semi-arid regions of the western hemisphere in an area extending from California to Argentina (1). In the United States, cases have been reported in Arizona, Nevada, Utah, New Mexico, and Texas. The spectrum of disease caused by C. immitis ranges from benign infection (“San Joaquin Valley Fever”) to severe disseminated process (“coccidioidal granuloma”) (2). About 60% of primary infections by C. immitis are asymptomatic. Systemic disease occurs in about 40% of primary infections and ranges from mild respiratory infection to severe pneumonia. The clinical syndrome of some C. immitis infections, with higher incidence in females than males, is similar to delayed hypersensitivity to fungus and is considered to be an allergic phenomenon. (3).

Coccidioidin (CDN), the broth culture filtrate of mycelia of C. immitis has been the classic antigen preparation for immune response to this fungus (4). As many as 90% of persons who reside in areas epidemic for coccidioidomycosis manifest skin-test reactivity to CDN.

The majority of patients with active coccidioidal disease have elevated serum IgG (5). IgA is elevated in about 20% of patients with active disease with the higher frequency occurring in patients with pulmonary coccidioidomycosis. Generally, antibodies directed against C. immitis antigens have been detected within the IgM, IgG, IgA and IgE classes.

Studies showed sensitive serological assays such as EIA increase the sensitivity but slightly decrease the specificity (6). The Micro Detect “COCCIDIOIDES DETECT IgG” is an EIA assay which uses the cell-filtrate of C. immitis as the antigen for detecting specific serum IgG to C. immitis in human sera.

Coccidioides IgG

The first recorded case of Coccidioidomycosis occurred in 1891 in Argentina. C. immitis exists in soil and in the semi-arid regions of the western hemisphere in an area extending from California to Argentina (1). In the United States, cases have been reported in Arizona, Nevada, Utah, New Mexico, and Texas. The spectrum of disease caused by C. immitis ranges from benign infection (“San Joaquin Valley Fever”) to severe disseminated process (“coccidioidal granuloma”) (2). About 60% of primary infections by C. immitis are asymptomatic. Systemic disease occurs in about 40% of primary infections and ranges from mild respiratory infection to severe pneumonia. The clinical syndrome of some C. immitis infections, with higher incidence in females than males, is similar to delayed hypersensitivity to fungus and is considered to be an allergic phenomenon. (3).

Coccidioidin (CDN), the broth culture filtrate of mycelia of C. immitis has been the classic antigen preparation for immune response to this fungus (4). As many as 90% of persons who reside in areas epidemic for coccidioidomycosis manifest skin-test reactivity to CDN.

The majority of patients with active coccidioidal disease have elevated serum IgG (5). IgA is elevated in about 20% of patients with active disease with the higher frequency occurring in patients with pulmonary coccidioidomycosis. Generally, antibodies directed against C. immitis antigens have been detected within the IgM, IgG, IgA and IgE classes.

Studies showed sensitive serological assays such as EIA increase the sensitivity but slightly decrease the specificity (6). The Micro Detect “COCCIDIOIDES DETECT IgM” is an EIA assay which uses the cell-filtrate of C. immitis as the antigen for detecting specific serum IgM to C. immitis in human sera.

Coccidioides IgM